Window care tips straight from the experts

Window care

Upgrading the look and finish of your property’s windows is an important investment, but how do you care for your window units after installation? With the right maintenance and care, your double glazed windows can stay looking pristine.

Maintaining your windows doesn’t just enhance the appearance of your wider property, the correct care can maximise the lifespan and performance of your windows as well as keep any warranty you have intact.

As leading installers of double glazed windows, our specialist team has played an important role in many upgrade success stories – see our completed installations for yourself by visiting our windows gallery. However, our job isn’t finished the moment fitting is complete. We are on hand to deliver the very best advice regarding the long term care of your double glazed units. In this post our experts share their top tips for maintaining your windows all year round.

Get damp issues under control

The installation of new windows goes a long way in reducing condensation levels, an issue that is often at the centre of the cause of damp and mould around the home. Ensuring other damp issues are remedied is essential. Exposure to damp can result in a number of problems with your double glazed windows, with mould quickly and easily able to grow on window sealants and frames. Make sure damp issues are kept under control, especially in rooms prone to high levels of humidity, such as kitchens and bathrooms.

Keep things clean and pristine

Without regular cleaning, dirt and debris can easily build up on double glazed units. Over time this dirt and debris can cause discolouration or even damage, particularly to the sealants and hinges of your windows. Clean your windows regularly, paying attention to not just the glass but the frames and moving parts.

Choosing the right cleaning products for your windows is also important. Independent Network VEKA offers some helpful advice on that very topic in When I’m Cleaning Windows:

“Of course the old fashioned and much trialled and tested way to remove grime from your windows involves key ingredients from your kitchen cupboards – namely white wine vinegar. And newspapers. Never use solvent based cleaners, these will damage your windows. Your ideal washing solution should be half vinegar and half water. The newspaper should be crumpled up and saturated in your cleaning solution. Simply squeeze out the excess liquid and apply to your window in a circular motion. The window can then be wiped clean with a sheet of dry newspaper. If your window is streaking then it’s a sign that there is still dirt on the window so it is worth cleaning again. Newspaper is widely acknowledged as the best material to clean your windows.”

It is recommended that you clean your window units thoroughly at least once yearly using the appropriate cleaning methods and products.

Pay special attention to the frames

PVC-U products require a lot less maintenance than wooden windows. However paying particular attention to maintaining the frames of your units is important. A simple mixture of warm, soapy water will do the trick when it comes to keeping those frames in tip top condition. However, stubborn stains need something a little more heavy duty. There are a number of high quality, specialist cream based uPVC cleaners on the market. Whatever your chosen cleaning agent, avoiding scouring pads, steel wool and other abrasive items.

Maintain all moving parts

The moving parts of most PVC-U products require very minimal attention, with units fitted with plastic components needing no lubrication at all. For units with metal moving parts, occasional lubrication is recommended. A light machine oil is perfect for maintaining metal components, and should be used annually to ensure optimum performance.

It’s not just the condition of your windows that needs to be maintained. Improving window fittings and decoration as each season goes by is another step to making your neighbours green with envy. Read our latest autumn window makeover tips for inspiration.

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