Conservatory styles

A table inside a conservatory

Conservatories are a great addition to any home. Choosing the right design for your home is important, as it will have to suit your needs as well as compliment your property. Conservatories come in all shapes and sizes, the best design for you will depend on the space you have and your own preference. Whether you’re thinking of traditional styles such as Victorian or Edwardian, which will suit older properties or contemporary designs for a modern home, here is a guide to the different conservatory styles available to you.

Conservatory style guide

  • Victorian – This style is the epitome of conservatory design, with its bay front and ornate roof, the attractive Victorian conservatory is highly popular for people who adore a bit of heritage. It makes full use of the space available, standing out from the property with a sloping roof on each side and a rounded wall at each end. Although the Victorian is a traditional design, it looks good on most properties, modern – or period.
  • Edwardian/Georgian – Similar to the Victorian design, except this conservatory has a   square or rectangular shape with a flat front, and pitched roof on each side.
  • Glass Extension – A modern design for modern homes, the Glass Extension is a fashionable alternative to a traditional conservatory. It has a minimal contemporary look which stands out from the rest.
  • P-Shape – These suit larger houses. This conservatory is a combination of a Lean-To and Victorian design. The P- Shape is great if you need extra space as you can create two separate living areas.
  • Lean-To -The Lean-To, also known as a Mediterranean conservatory, is a simple design which has a contemporary look. Ideal for smaller properties, such as bungalows, it is a tidy design with clean lines, and is sometimes referred to as a sunroom or garden room.
  • Gable – These can be identified by their unique triangular shape at the front, much like a roof has a gable-end. The roof doesn’t slope back to the centre, but stays upright – which gives height. The elevated roof in this design allows more light to come into the room.
  • T-Shape – Another great conservatory for larger houses, these are intended to run the length of your home, and can be in either Victorian or Georgian design. The T-Shape is good if you need extra living space and it’s ideal for properties with large gardens, as the part of the conservatory that extends away from the house tends to go into the garden, it also a popular choice with those who are intending to build an indoor pool.
  • Lantern – This conservatory roof is larger than the Gable, and is perfect for large conservatories. With its grand appearance, it looks fabulous on large period properties. Because of its high roof, it lets in lots of light and has a very luxurious feel.
  • Loggia – These have more brickwork than most conservatories, and similar to an Orangery. With its columns it resembles an extension rather than a conservatory. Inspired by the Italian renaissance period, where a roofed room was designed to open each side and supported by ornate columns. These conservatories will create a beautiful and comfortable living space for your home.
  • Orangery – Technically an Orangery is not a conservatory, they are generally referred to as sunrooms. The difference is that an orangery has walls that are made from stone or brick, sometimes hardwood; they have large windows and sometimes a sunroof. Orangeries were originally added to grand houses during the seventeenth to nineteenth centuries.

As you can see there so many designs to choose from.

Tags: ,